Pedosphere 27(5): 792--806, 2017
ISSN 1002-0160/CN 32-1315/P
©2017 Soil Science Society of China
Published by Elsevier B.V. and Science Press
Soil carbon dynamics under changing climate—a research transition from absolute to relative roles of inorganic nitrogen pools and associated microbial processes: A review
Pratap SRIVASTAVA1, Rishikesh SINGH2, Sachchidan TRIPATHI3, Pardeep SINGH4, Shikha SINGH2, Hema SINGH5, Akhilesh Singh RAGHUBANSHI2, Pradeep Kumar MISHRA1
1Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)
2Institute of Environment & Sustainable Development (IESD), Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)
3Department of Botany, Deen Dayal Upadhyaya College, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110015 (India)
4Department of Environmental Studies, Pannalal Girdharlal Dayanand Anglo-Vedic College, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110065 (India)
5Ecosystems Analysis Laboratory, Department of Botany, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)
Corresponding Author:Pratap SRIVASTAVA
ABSTRACT
      It is globally accepted that soil carbon (C) dynamics are at the core of interlinked environmental problems, deteriorating soil quality and changing climate. Its management remains a complex enigma for the scientific community due to its intricate relationship with soil nitrogen (N) availability and moisture-temperature interactions. This article reviews the management aspects of soil C dynamics in light of recent advances, particularly in relation to the availability of inorganic N pools and associated microbial processes under changing climate. Globally, drastic alterations in soil C dynamics under changing land use and management practices have been primarily attributed to the variation in soil N availability, resulting in a higher decomposition rate and a considerable decline in soil organic C (SOC) levels due to increased soil CO2 emissions, degraded soil quality, and increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations, leading to climate warming. Predicted climate warming is proposed to enhance SOC decomposition, which may further increase soil N availability, leading to higher soil CO2 efflux. However, a literature survey revealed that soil may also act as a potential C sink, if we could manage soil inorganic N pools and link microbial processes properly. Studies also indicated that the relative, rather than the absolute, availability of inorganic N pools might be of key importance under changing climate, as these N pools are variably affected by moisture-temperature interactions, and they have variable impacts on SOC turnover. Therefore, multi-factorial studies are required to understand how the relative availability of inorganic N pools and associated microbial processes may determine SOC dynamics for improved soil C management.
Key Words:  agro-management, immobilization, NH4+-N to NO3--N ratio, nitrification, relative availability, soil CO2 efflux
Citation: Pratap, S., Rishikesh, S., Sachchidan, T., Pardeep, S., Shikha, S., Hema, S., Singh, R. and Kumar, M. 2017. Soil carbon dynamics under changing climate—a research transition from absolute to relative roles of inorganic nitrogen pools and associated microbial processes: A review. Pedosphere. 27(5): 792-806.
View Full Text



Copyright © 2017 Editorial Committee of PEDOSPHERE. All rights reserved.
Address: P. O. Box 821, 71 East Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008, China    E-mail: pedosphere@issas.ac.cn
Technical support: Beijing E-Tiller Co.,Ltd.